Thursday, September 20, 2007

What if...

Along the lines of yesterday's post, I'm reminded of a moving piece from a recent Newsweek: The Love That Will Finally Speak Its Name by Loraine Barr. I hope everyone reads it, but I want to be fair and warn anyone who might be still new to the subject that it's about homosexuality.

It's the story of a woman who didn't come out of the closet until the death of her partner of 44 years. She tells of the times she lived in, and how there was really no way for her to be open through much of her life. Then, when being open became more okay, the two of them simply had the ingrained habit of staying hidden. So they were never able to publicly celebrate their union.

Kind of the reverse in some ways of what I wrote about yesterday, huh? But still similar—the context of the times causes someone to hide the truth.

My heart aches for people even now who cannot reveal all of themselves because of the context in which we live. What do people feel compelled to hide today? It might be a strongly held belief system, like creationism in a blue state or Darwinism in a red state. It might be having a psychological condition or a child in jail. It might be having a past that includes bankruptcy or drug abuse.

And the whole reason we have to hide these things is the intolerance we expect we'll receive if we reveal them. The shunning, the uncomfortable looks, the outright disapproval and rejection.

But what if it became a priority for all humanity to learn to see through all that? What if everyone learned how to see the good in others *first,* before the label or the controversy? What if we all first thought of each other as children of the Divine, created in the image of Light, the likeness of Soul? Don't you think then any other characteristic would become less important? And we'd be able to love each other where we stand?

It's occurring to me today that that's why I'm so on fire about sharing Christian Science. I think Christian Science is a great way to learn how to see the Truth about each other. It's part of the Christian Science discipline to prioritize the good as way more important than any perceived flaw. In fact, good is all we're supposed to see when the discipline of Christian Science is applied fully. The flaws, if they were flaws to begin with, become inconsequential, nothing.

If everyone did this, what a world it would be.


Your ideas and inspiration are welcome! Please comment below or Contact Laura.
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2 Comments:

At 9/21/2007 01:41:00 PM, Blogger Laura said...

I'm sorry, I've only had to do this once before in the almost 2.5 years I've been blogging, but I needed to take down a comment that was posted to this entry because it appeared to be equating homosexuality with criminal behavior. So sorry, whoever you were (it was posted anonymously), I just had to take it down because the comparison was inappropriate.

warmly,
Laura
@}-->--

 
At 9/21/2007 02:56:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hello Laura,

I don’t think calling yourself a lesbian or a homosexual will lead to much of a problem in society these days as long as there is no engaging in sodomy (and only God and the people themselves will know about this aspect of their relationship). It is the sodomy part of homosexuality that is a sin, I think, not the having a fond relationship with a member of the same sex.

You introduced the thought, “And the whole reason we have to hide these things is the intolerance we expect we'll receive if we reveal them. The shunning, the uncomfortable looks, the outright disapproval and rejection.”

But what if – the old “what if” - a teenage child “comes out” to his or her parents or friends that they are having an intimate relationship not with some person but with some drug, say heroin, and don’t want to stay in the closet regarding this pleasurable addition to their life.

You commented in your article: “It's part of the Christian Science discipline to prioritize the good as way more important than any perceived flaw. In fact, good is all we're supposed to see when the discipline of Christian Science is applied fully. The flaws, if they were flaws to begin with, become inconsequential, nothing.”

I agree it would be best to have a mind that could be completely nonjudgmental regarding information received by the senses (like what we are hearing and seeing, for example), and to be able to immediately go into, or stay in, the metaphysical understanding mode of knowing God as All in all, and knowing that only God’s Life can come forth in this loved one who may be saying he or she is going steady with some drug we know little about.

I believe my mom may have helped skirt me out of a drinking and smoking problem years ago by using this method – she never said a word to me (not audibly, anyway, but she knew CS prayer power!). There is still no attraction in me to either drug.

However the idea that it is not okay to use heroin or whatever the “coming out” was about – maybe your son or daughter could have revealed to you what great pleasure they get from watching fires burn, or the thrill they get from stealing things – man, it is difficult to just set aside our established prejudices and see the perfect Christ as guiding this loved one.

The metaphysical approach will work best, I know – much better than a smack on the side of the head - but you will admit, I think, it may be difficult to do so when we’re challenged to be nonjudgmental in areas that we formerly – and probably still do - hold as taboo. Including homosexuality.

 

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